CROI 2015: Hepatitis C -- Mission Accomplished? [VIDEO]

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New interferon-free treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has brought about a revolution in treatment, but challenges still remain -- among them too few people with HCV being diagnosed and the high cost of the new drugs -- before the mission can be declared a success. A panel of hepatitis C experts discuss research presented at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections(CROI) in Seattle with HIVandHepatitis.com editor Liz Highleyman in this IFARA video.

 

[Liz Highleyman, Gregory Dore, Cindy Zahnd, Kenneth Sherman, David Wyles, Susanna Naggie, IFARA hepatitis C panel, CROI, February 26, 2015]

Susanna Naggie from Duke Clinical Research Center and David Wyles from the University of California at San Diego described their research showing that 2 direct-acting antiviral regimens taken for 12 weeks -- sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (Harvoni), and sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) plus daclatasvir (Daklinza) -- cured 96% of HIV/HCV coinfected people.

Kenneth Sherman from the University of Cincinnati and colleagues found that an older DAA, telaprevir, combined with pegylated interferon and ribavirin was effective for people with hemophilia.

Cindy Zahnd from the University of Bern found that people who are treated only after they progress to severe liver fibrosis or cirrhosis are more likely to experience liver failure, liver cancer, and liver-related death -- even after being cured -- providing support for early treatment.

Gregory Dore from the University of New South Wales discussed another benefit of earlier and more widespread hepatitis C therapy: treatment as prevention. Providing prompt therapy to the people most likely to transmit HCV could dramatically reduce new infections.

SEE ALSO:

CROI 2015: Interferon-Free Regimens Show High Cure Rates for HIV/HCV Coinfected

CROI 2015: Deferring Hepatitis C Treatment Can Lead to Liver Cancer and Death

3/6/15

References

G Dore. HCV Treatment as Prevention: Challenges and Opportunities. 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Seattle, February 23-24, 2015. Abstract 180.

KE Sherman, R Ke, SD Rouster, et al. Viral Kinetic Profiles of HCV Response to Telaprevir-Based Therapy in Patients With Hemophilia. 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Seattle, February 23-24, 2015. Abstract 690.

S Naggie, C Cooper, MS Saag, et al. Ledipasvir/Sofosbuvir for 12 Weeks in Patients Coinfected With HCV and HIV-1. 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Seattle, February 23-24, 2015. Abstract 152LB.

D Wyles, P Ruane, M Sulkowski, et al. Daclatasvir in Combination With Sofosbuvir for HIV/HCV Coinfection: ALLY-2 Study‚Ä®. 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Seattle, February 23-24, 2015. Abstract 151LB.

C Zahnd, LP Salazar-Vizcaya, J-F Dufour, et al (Swiss HIV and Hepatitis C Cohort Studies Team). Impact of Deferring HCV Treatment on Liver-Related Events in HIV+ Patients. 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Seattle, February 23-24, 2015. Abstract 150.