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Studies Explore Viral Reactivation Strategies for Potential HIV Cure

Compounds that increase random fluctuations or "noise" in HIV gene expression can help trigger reactivation of latent HIV in immune cells, one of the key barriers to a cure, researchers reported in the June 20 edition of Science. A related study identified another type of agent -- Ingenol B, derived from an Amazonian plant -- that reactivates latent HIV reservoirs, but another study found that one type of latency releaser may facilitate infection of CD4 cells.

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HIV Cure Is a Major Priority, Research to be Presented at AIDS 2014

Finding a cure for HIV is a key scientific priority, and researchers have taken promising steps towards a "functional cure" that could enable some people with HIV to stay off antiretroviral therapy without disease progression. In the lead-up to the 20th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014) later this month in Melbourne, The Lancet has published a review of the global epidemic and prospects for the future.

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CROI 2014: Early Antiretroviral Therapy May Limit Gut Damage and Immune Activation

Starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) at the earliest stage of HIV infection can help prevent immune cell dysregulation that contributes to destruction of the gut lining and promotes systemic immune over-activation, according to a study presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) last week in Boston.

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CROI 2014: Early Treatment Reduces Viral Reservoirs but Does Not Prevent Rebound

Antiretroviral therapy started during the first several days after infection limited dissemination of an HIV-like virus throughout the body and establishment of cellular and tissue reservoirs in monkeys, though it did not prevent the virus from coming back after stopping treatment, according to research presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) last week in Boston.

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Coverage of the 2014 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014), March 3-6, 2014, in Boston.

Conference highlights include new treatments for hepatitis C, HIV experimental therapies and treatment strategies, HIV cure research, HIV-related conditions, treatment as prevention and PrEP, and HIV/HCV coinfection.

Full listing by topic

Selected presentations and slide webcasts 

3/9/14

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