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Conditioning with Cytoxan Increases Protected Cells in HIV Gene Therapy Trial

Administering cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), a chemotherapy drug toxic to certain immune cells, prior to zinc-finger gene therapy appears to make room for increased proliferation of altered CD4 T-cells lacking the CCR5 co-receptor, researchers reported at the 6th International Workshop on HIV Persistence during Therapy last week in Miami.

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HIV Re-emerges in Boston Bone Marrow Transplant Patients

Two bone marrow stem cell recipients who had undetectable HIV according to the most sensitive tests for months after an experimental antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption have experienced viral rebound and had to restart treatment, frustrating hopes for a functional cure, according to a report at the 6th International Workshop on HIV Persistence during Therapy last week in Miami.

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Gene Therapy Study Participant Maintains HIV Viral Suppression Off ART, Sangamo Says

A patient who received genetically modified CD4 T-cells lacking a co-receptor that enables HIV entry has maintained undetectable viral load during an antiretroviral treatment interruption lasting 14 weeks, according to a presentation at the annual meeting of the European Society of Gene and Cell Therapy taking place this week in Madrid.

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The Lancet/Cell Conference Asks: What Will it Take to Achieve an AIDS-free World?

"What will it take to achieve and AIDS-free world?" was the question on everyone's mind at a small meeting of the same name held November 3-5 at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco. A Cell press release stated that the goal of the meeting was to "bridge the gap between researchers and clinicians in a joint effort to identify what needs to be done before an AIDS-free world can go from dream to reality."

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Researchers Publish Case Report of Mississippi Baby Cured of HIV

The case report of a child who remains free of detectable HIV more than 18 months after interrupting combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) that had been started within 2 days after birth has now been published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Experts have called this accidental experiment "proof-of-concept" that very early treatment may be able to cure HIV in some individuals.

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